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Here is the transcription of the lesson. We made if for you such a way that you can listen to the audio by clicking on its button and at the same time follow the text as well by scrolling it. This way you can anytime stop the audio and do some research or other things and then continue in studying this profound subject. And here you can download a compilation of the Bible and Spirit of Prophecy quotes used in this lesson.

When you would interrupt at the certain minute your listening to the audio of this lesson and later on you would like to continue from such given minute and at the same time to follow the transcript of the lesson, just type CTRL-F (Find function) in your web browser and insert few words you will hear as you start to listen the lecture again. This search will jump straight to that place and you will be able to read what you are listening to. Gradually we are inserting the minute and second of the given quotes that you can locate faster these precious insights. 😉

Now to this point in our seminar we’ve been focusing primarily on the fact that He is our sinless Substitute and why He had to be such in order to fulfill His mission to save the fallen race. And I grant you that we have not given equal emphasis to this other precious truth. But that’s only because we have not arrived there yet. It’s not because we don’t equally emphasize it in the whole seminar. So be patient. It will have its full emphasis.

{Audio starts from this point:} Before we proceed with our study, though, we need to again recognize the simple basic truth that spiritual things are only spiritually discerned. And brothers and sisters, we can never presume to be able to understand God’s word to the point of being transformed by the truth that we study, sanctified by it, unless we have the spirit of truth. Jesus said that we were to be sanctified by what? The truth, and it is His word that contains the truth. We are proposing to study this word. My prayer is that that study might lead to our sanctification, but if that is to be, we must have what? The spirit of truth working in our behalf. And I especially need that spirit working in my behalf. Please pray for me as you pray for yourself and your brothers and sisters. Shall we kneel.

My Father in heaven, I thank you for this special holy day. I thank you for this special place where we can come apart, leaving all of the business of life behind, to worship you. Father, we want to worship in spirit and in truth. Therefore, we must have the spirit of truth here. That’s why, before we proceed, we invoke your presence, Lord God. Indwell this small sanctuary with your presence. Indwell it so completely that there is no room for the power of evil. And Father, likewise, indwell each of our sanctuaries so fully that there is no room for the power of sin, self or Satan to interfere in what you would have us come to know from the study of your word. And Father, what we know from your word we want to know it in such a way that will lead to our freedom from our natural bondage to sin, self and Satan. Jesus promised us, Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free. Lord, by the spirit of truth, give us such a knowledge of truth that we might fully, personally, daily experience its liberating power. Lord, I pray, I plead that you would condescend to take full possession of this poor earthen vessel. Oh, Lord, not because I am worthy but because I am needy, I ask you to fill me with your Spirit. You have commissioned me to proclaim the truth as it is in Jesus and, Father, you never ask us to do that which you do not enable us to do, so I am trusting you now by your supernatural power to enable me to fulfill the commission you have given me. And Father, I plead with you to protect me from myself. May not I in any way distort the truth. Oh, protect me from saying anything that would mislead a brother or sister here. That is my greatest fear, Lord, that I should dishonor my Lord in any way by what escapes from my mouth. Touch my lips, I pray, with a coal from the altar and sanctify my whole being that I, in spite of my earthiness, might proclaim the truth and only the truth as it is in Jesus. And Father, should you condescend to do that, through me, you shall receive all the praise and all the glory for it will have been in spite of me and because of you. In Jesus’ name I thank you for hearing and answering my prayer. Amen.

In our last study, we considered together our standing before the infinite standard of God’s law. The study was entitled, “What the Law Could Not Do,” and we considered that even as born-again Christians, in relationship to the infinite standard of the law as far as what we are in ourselves, we are what? We are under condemnation. To use the words of the servant of the Lord, Are you in Christ? Not if you do not acknowledge yourself erring, helpless, condemned sinners. In ourselves we are what? We are condemned sinners. But in Christ we are what? We are righteous. We are condemned sinners in ourselves because, even though sin does not reign in the born-again Christian, it still what? Still remains. Though it does not preside, it still resides. And as again the servant of the Lord tells us, it resides, it remains until what point? Glorification.

Review and Herald, November 29, 1887: “From the cross to the crown.” That’s from conversion to glorification. “From the cross to the crown there is earnest work to be done, there is wrestling with inbred sin.” Wrestling with inbred sin. Now that’s after the close of probation, isn’t it? But brothers and sisters, let us recognize together that though even after the close of probation there is this thing called inbred sin, and though we are sinners by nature even after the close of probation, we must not be sinning after the close of probation, willfully yielding to those lusts of that old man, both of which are under condemnation.

If we by enabling grace refuse to consent to those lusts that are condemnable, that come from that old nature, that inbred sin which is condemnable, are we held under condemnation for having had that nature and its lusts? No, we’re not. Why? Because it’s not condemnable in itself? No. Because there is provision in the atonement to cover for it. That is the precious good news of the gospel. Christ condemned sin in the flesh, not only as our example, being made in the likeness of sinful flesh–and we will consider that–but he condemned sin in the flesh as our substitute as well, for He was made in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin condemned sin in the flesh. He was a sin offering for sin in the flesh. And therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are what? In Christ Jesus. Who do not what? Who do not walk after the flesh but rather walk after the spirit. Praise God for the provision.

We came to the conclusion in our study last night that weighed and found wanting is our inscription by nature. Let’s review that statement. It’s found in the morning watch book, IN HEAVENLY PLACES, page 156: “We are enlightened by the precepts of the law but no man can by them be justified.” Enlightened, yes, but justified, no. Reading on. “Weighed and found wanting is our inscription by nature, but Christ is our Mediator and accepting Him as our Savior, we may claim the promise being justified by faith. We have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

But then we ask ourselves, If Christ has just the same nature we do, what is the verdict of the law? Weighed in the balance and found wanting. And brothers and sisters, if that is true with our Lord, then we are without hope. So we came to the conclusion last night that we must not, in our efforts to make Christ a sympathetic Elder Brother and a valid Example, to make him one that we recognize was tempted in all things like as we are. We must not in our effort to do that make Him one altogether such as we are. For if He is altogether such as we are in nature, He is weighed in the balance and found wanting and we have not a sinless Substitute. And we need one, don’t we? We need one. Why? Because the requirement of the law is not only that we have absolutely sinlessness but that we have what? Infinite righteousness. It requires sinlessness equal to God’s and righteousness equal to God’s. “Be ye therefore perfect even as your father in heaven is perfect,” Christ says in summing up His discussion of the law.

So Paul puts it this way. Romans 3:19, 20: “Now we know that whatever the law says it says to those who are under the law that every mouth may be stopped and all the world may become guilty before God.” Verse 20. “Therefore by the deeds of the law shall no flesh be justified in his sight for by the law is the knowledge of sin.” Verse 23. “For all have sinned,” and what? “Come short of the glory of God.” Not only have we failed as far as absolute sinlessness. All have sinned. But we fail as far as infinite righteousness. All come short. And that in the Greek, by the way, is the present tense. All are coming short of the glory of God. And what is His glory? His character. What is the transcript of that character? His law. Therefore, what is that saying? We all fail to fulfill the infinite standard. Is that true even of the Christian? In himself he comes short, brothers and sisters. Oh, yes.

Sanctified Life, page 81: “He who is truly seeking holiness of heart and life delights in the law of God but mourns only that he falls so far short of meeting its requirements.” Only that he falls so far short of meeting its requirements. So then we have failed, not only as far as the absolute sinlessness requirement is concerned but we miserable fail as far as the infinite righteousness requirement is concerned. We are therefore utterly without hope unless–unless–we can find One who has both the absolute sinlessness and the infinite righteousness that the law requires. The absolute sinlessness that our sinfulness might be imputed to Him. And the infinite righteousness that His righteousness might be imputed to us. One who is willing and able to die on account of what we are that we might live on account of what He is. And where do we find such a One? Praise God, in our sinless Substitute, Jesus Christ.

And here’s the title of our study. He Who Knew No Sin. Turn with me to II Corinthians 5:21. And brothers and sisters, I thrill right now at the privilege of studying this precious, precious truth with you. Oh, how precious indeed it is. II Corinthians 5:21: “For he made him who knew no sin to be sin.” For whom? “For us that we might become” what? The righteousness of whom? Of God. What kind of righteousness is that? Infinite righteousness. “That we might become the righteousness of God” where? In Him.

Do we have then in our Savior One who has an absolute sinlessness? Yes. He who knew no sin. Do we have One then upon whom our sinfulness can be imputed? Yes. And do we have One in whom there is an infinite righteousness? Oh, yes. Do we have One then who can impute that infinite righteousness to us that we might be justified? Yes, we do. He made Him who knew no sin for us that we might become the righteousness of God in Him. And brothers and sisters, God had this provision all planned back in the ceaseless ages of eternity in the eventuality or the possibility of man’s fall. There was a plan to meet the emergency.

I read from Manuscript 80, 1903: “In the councils of heaven before the creation of the world, when it was planned that man should people the earth, there arose the question, What if man should sin as Satan has? Christ answered this question. The infinite Son of God pledged Himself that if man should sin He would give Himself, His life a ransom for the fallen race, taking upon Himself the transgression of humanity. The innocent would bear the sins of the guilty and stand before God to make intercession in behalf of the transgressor.” Praise God for such a plan.

Bible Echoes, August 1, 1893: “Through the death of Christ a door of hope was opened for the fallen race. Man was under sentence of death for the transgression of the law of God. He was under condemnation as a traitor, as a rebel, but Christ came to be his Substitute, to die as a malefactor, to suffer the penalty of the traitors, bearing the weight of their sins upon His divine soul.”

But to do this, to bear the weight of our sins upon His divine soul, what did He have to be in Himself? Weighed in the balance. Could He be found wanting? If He was to bear the weight of our sins, He must have absolutely no weight of His own sins to bear. He must be absolutely sinless. Was He?

Review and Herald, July 17, 1901: “In His sinlessness, He would bear every transgression.” Now there are those who suggest that it is not ethical for one who is sinless to die for the sins of another. But brothers and sisters, quite the opposite is true. It is only ethical for one who is sinless to die for the sins of another. Anyone who is sinful cannot ethically die for the sins of another for he must die for his own sins. Was He absolutely sinless in every sense of the word?

Selected Messages, volume 3, page 131: “Christ did not possess the same sinful, corrupt, fallen disloyalty we possess, for then He could not be a perfect offering.” Is that clear? “Christ did not possess the same sinful, corrupt, fallen disloyalty we possess, for then He could not be a perfect offering.” Absolute sinlessness was essential for Christ to be our Substitute. Does scripture assure us of such? I Peter 2:22. What does it say as far as sinlessness of deed is concerned? He had to be absolutely sinless in the realm of His behavior, did He not, His words, His actions? Was He? I Peter 2:22: “Who committed no sin nor was guile found in his mouth.” Sinless by deed and by word, wasn’t He? Why? So that He could bear the sins of our deeds and words. Right?

But does sin only reach to deeds and words? No, it reaches to thoughts as well. Was He sinless in this realm? II Corinthians 5:21, our key text: “He made him who” what? “Who knew no sin.” No sin of thought, no sin at all in our righteous Substitute. But does sin only reach to the level of our thoughts and feelings? No, it reaches to the level of our very nature. There is a sinfulness of nature that is under condemnation. We have studied and established that point very clearly up to this point in our series, and we need not reiterate it.

In the words of inspiration again, “Human nature is depraved and is justly condemned by a holy God.” I don’t have the reference right now but you recall that, and perhaps you have it in your notes. “Human nature is depraved.” Human nature is depraved, and is justly condemned by a holy God. Sin reaches to our very nature. Was Christ sinless in nature? I John 3:5: “And you know that he was manifested to take away our sins” and what? “In him there is no sin.” Oh, brothers and sisters, this includes, does it not, inbred sin? Why, of course, it does; it must. If He is to take upon Himself the condemnation of inbred sin, can He have inbred sin in Himself? No, He is under condemnation for His own inbred sin. How can he take the condemnation of ours? He cannot. Indeed He was sinless in nature. There was no sinfulness in His human nature.

Signs of the Times, May 29, 1901: “In the fullness of time he was to be revealed in human form. He was to take his position at the head of humanity by taking the nature but not the sinfulness of man.” By taking the nature but not the what? The sinfulness of man. Why? Because He came to be man’s righteous substitute, to be the sin offering for sinfulness of nature. And if He had taken that on Himself, He would have by so doing incapacitated Himself to be the sin offering for sinfulness of nature. Right? Of course. Therefore, He took His position at the head of humanity by taking the nature but not the sinfulness of man.

Manuscript 143, 1897: “There should not be the faintest misgivings in regard to the perfect freedom from sinfulness in the human nature of Christ.” How can language be more clear, I ask you?

Please, which nature are we talking about? The human nature of Christ. There are so many who like to suggest that, yes, He was sinless in His divine nature but not in His human nature. Well, brothers and sisters, what does the servant of the Lord tell us? And this is authority in my book. I hope it is in yours. This is authority greater than our own human reasoning, isn’t it? “There should not be the faintest misgivings in regard to the perfect freedom from sinfulness in the human nature of Christ.”

Now that statement was the rough draft version of an article that appeared in the Signs of the Times, June 9, 1898. Listen to the way the servant of the Lord wrote it again. “We should have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ.” He both had perfect freedom from sinfulness and He had perfect what? Sinlessness. I read that again. “We should have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ.” Note with me, please, note with me the full significance of this statement. We are not here exhorted to have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human life of Christ, are we? Though in many other places she underscores the perfect sinlessness of His life. We are here exhorted to have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ.

Note as well, we are not here exhorted to have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the divine nature of Christ. Such an exhortation would be meaningless for by definition the divine nature is what? Is sinless, for it is infinitely righteous and absolutely perfect. We are here exhorted to have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ.

And again, we are not here exhorted to have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human character of Christ. Though in other places she speaks of it not only as sinless but as being infinitely righteous. No, we are here exhorted to have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ. Note once more. We are not here exhorted to have no misgivings in regard to the relative sinlessness of the human nature of Christ. We are here exhorted to have no misgivings in regard to the what? Perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ. We are exhorted to know, in other words, that He was absolutely what? Sinless. Where? In nature. Why? To bear our sins of nature.

But note, finally, we are not here exhorted to have few or only occasional misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ. We are here exhorted to have no, absolutely no, misgivings, that is, thoughts or feelings of doubt, distrust, fear, apprehension, in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ. And brothers and sisters, indeed, if His human nature is in any way sinful, as far as being infected by sin is concerned, we must not only have misgivings, we must despair, for we would not have in Him a sinless sacrifice. He would not be our Substitute for He would be on the cross on account of His own sinfulness of nature and not yours and mine.

Nor would we find in Him a righteousness equal to the demands of the law, an infinite righteousness. For if He had the same sinfulness of nature we have, what would that have rendered His obedience? Faulty and imperfect. In short, we would have no Savior if He were sinful in nature, no hope of salvation. Oh, I pray that that is clear, my brother, my sister.

Spirit of Prophecy, volume 2, page 9: “Man could not atone for man. He was created lower than the angels and his sinful, fallen condition would constitute him an imperfect offering, an atoning sacrifice of less value than Adam before his fall. God made man perfect and upright and after his transgression there could be no sacrifice acceptable to God for him unless the offering made should be in value be superior to man as he was in his state of perfection and innocency.” Is that clear? If Jesus Christ came, as far as sinfulness is concerned, in the state of man after the fall, could He have been an offering that was sufficient? Absolutely not. Man could not atone for man. Why? He was created lower than the angels and his sinful, fallen condition would constitute him an imperfect offering. An atoning sacrifice of less value than Adam before his fall. “God made man perfect and upright and after his transgression there could be no sacrifice acceptable to God for man unless the offering made should in value be superior to man as he was in his state of perfection and innocency.”

Was the sacrifice superior? Yes, it was. Listen. Reading on. “Christ alone could open the way by making an offering equal to the demands of the divine law. He was perfect and undefiled by sin. He was without spot or blemish.” He was undefiled by any sin, sin of deed, sin of word, sin of thought, sin of nature. There was no inbred sin in Him because even inbred sin would have been a defilement. And He would have been of less value than man before the fall. Even if He had never yielded to that, He still by virtue of having had it, would have been of less value than man before the fall. Is this clear? Are we doing violence in coming to these conclusions to the intent of what has been written? I cannot see it. I ask you to show me if we are.

Signs of the Times, June 9, 1898. Listen to the same statement. And let it answer this question: Why is it so vitally important to establish beyond doubt the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ? Listen. “We should have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ. Our faith must be an intelligent faith. Looking unto Jesus in perfect confidence, in full and entire faith in the atoning sacrifice. This is essential that the soul may not be shrouded in darkness. The holy Substitute is able to save to the uttermost, for He presented to the wondering universe perfect and complete humility in His human character and perfect obedience to all the requirements of God.”

His perfect sinlessness in nature is essential for an intelligent faith, brothers and sisters, and this is the victory that overcometh the world, even our what? Our faith. We have to know that our sinfulness of nature was condemned and crucified in Christ if we are going to be able to be overcomers.

Manuscript 92, 1891: “Christ was without sin else His life in human flesh and His death on the cross would have been of no more value in procuring grace for the sinner than the death of any man.” Again–and forgive me if I overemphasize this point. Brothers and sisters, there is so much being said that is misleading in this area. I want to equip you with “thus saith the Lord,” so that you can withstand perversions of this truth.

I read Bible Commentary, volume 5, page 1128: “Never in any way leave the slightest impression upon human minds that a taint of or inclination to corruption rested upon Christ, or that He in any way yielded to corruption.” Do you see the development there? He didn’t yield to corruption. Now, there is nobody in any of these schools of thought that we have been discussing who would suggest that Christ was sinful by nature. No one suggests that He yielded to corruption. But is that all she wants us to know, that He didn’t yield to corruption?

Listen. “Never in any way leave the slightest impression upon human minds that a taint of or inclination to corruption rested upon Christ, or that He in any way yielded to corruption.” I read on. “Let every human being be warned from the ground of making Christ altogether human, such an one as ourselves, for it cannot be.” Brothers and sisters, it cannot be, if He is to be our Savior. It cannot be. He would have Himself needed what? A Savior.

I Peter 2:24. Turn with me there in your Bibles. Note it with me, please. “Who himself bore our sins in his own body on the tree that we, having died to sins, might live for righteousness, by whose stripes we are healed.” Only as the sinless One could He bear our sins, brothers and sisters.

Manuscript 48A, 1897: “The sins of the guilty world which in figure are represented as red as crimson were imputed to the divine surety. Surely he hath borne our griefs. He was made sin for us because he was innocent of all sin. The Lord hath laid on him the iniquity of us all.” In order to be our Sinbearer, he had to be innocent of all sin, including inbred sin.

Signs of the Times, December 5, 1892: “Guiltless, he bore the punishment of the guilty. Innocent, yet offering himself as a substitute for the transgressor. The guilt of every sin pressed its weight upon the divine soul of the world’s Redeemer.” What, as the sinless One, could and did He bear, brothers and sisters? Isaiah 53:6, 7. Oh, consider this precious truth. “And the Lord has laid on him” the what? The iniquity of how many of us? Of us all. “He was oppressed and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth. He was led as a lamb to the slaughter.” The Lord laid the iniquity of us all upon the spotless lamb.

Signs of the Times, December 9, 1897. Think of it. “All the accumulated sin of the world was laid upon the Sinbearer, the one who alone could be the propitiation for sin because He himself was obedient.”

Signs of the Times, May 19, 1890: “Adam sinned and the children of Adam share his guilt and its consequences.” We wrestled with that truth in an earlier study. What about this guilt of Adam that his children bear? “Adam sinned and the children of Adam share his guilt and its consequences. But” –here’s the precious good news — “Jesus bore the guilt of Adam, and all the children of Adam that will flee to Christ, the second Adam, may escape the penalty of transgression.” The children of Adam bear his guilt. By natural birth, they are under condemnation on account of the sin of Adam. Do they have any choice in that matter? No. Is that fair? Sin is never fair. But praise God, they have a choice as to whether or not to continue to bear that guilt. They can choose to come to Jesus and let Him take it from them and bear it Himself. They can choose to be born again.

And brothers and sisters, please recognize with me an important point. If we complain about being condemned and sentenced to death on account of Adam’s sin–don’t lose me–we also have to complain about being justified and promised eternal life on account of Christ’s obedience. Did you follow me? Romans 5:19: “By the disobedience of one the many were made sinners.” Not so, we say. Oh, but be carefully. Don’t be too quick. The second half says, “Even so, by the obedience of one, the many will be made” what? Righteous. Do you want to cry out, Not fair? No, you don’t, do you? But please recognize the principle. These are unique individuals and they have the unique capacity being the two heads of the human race, to have legal, direct influence on the whole race. Adam as the legal representative brought condemnation upon the whole race, and the whole race is born under that condemnation and sentenced to death. Now their own sinfulness simply ratifies the fact that they are born in the fallen race, and their own sin simply verifies their own sinfulness. But what is it that is the cause of their condemnation? Adam’s sin.

When we’re born again–follow me, please–what is the cause of our justification? Christ’s righteousness. Is it caused by something we are in ourselves? No, that new heart that we receive simply evidences the fact that we are indeed now members of the new race. And our own obedience simply ratifies the presence of the new heart. But the justification is based upon what? The obedience of the Second Adam. Do you see that truth? Don’t be so quick to resent the imputation of Adam’s guilt to you because, if you do, you have to resent the imputation of Christ’s righteousness to you. It’s on the same legal basis, precisely, because those two bear the same relationship to us. Legally, one by natural birth; the other, by rebirth.

Desire of Ages, page 598: “Those who trust in him he never disappoints. He has borne every test, he has endured the pressure of Adam’s guilt and the guilt of his posterity, and he has come off more than conqueror of the powers of evil. He has borne the burdens cast upon him by every repenting sinner. In Christ, the guilty heart has found relief. He is the sure foundation. All who make him their dependence rest in perfect security.”

Oh, brothers and sisters, when you confess your sinfulness of nature, as the apostles did–Acts of the Apostles, 561–men who would rather die than knowingly transgress God’s law. They still did what? They confessed the sinfulness of their nature. When you confess the sinfulness of your nature, you can rest in total confidence that there is no condemnation now because He bore the sinfulness of that nature, and the condemnation for it was exhausted on His head. And why and how could He bear it? Because He didn’t have it in Himself.

But think, my brother, my sister, think of what suffering this load must have caused our Lord. All the accumulated sin, not only of Adam but of his posterity, all of those heinous crimes ever committed, He bore. Did He only bear the sins that we repent of? He bore all sins. The provision far, far exceeds the necessity. He bore all sins. But think of the suffering it must have cost Him, especially when we recognize the total revulsion and sensitivity and avoidance of His whole sinless being in relationship to sin. Think of the suffering it must have caused Him.

In the morning watch book, The Upward Look, page 51: “He (Christ) was nearing the close of His ministry upon this earth and was standing in view of the cross with a full realization of the load of guilt that must be placed upon Him as Sinbearer. Yet,” listen to these words, “His greatest anxiety was for His disciples.” Oh, such a Lord! And who are His disciples? We are. Even overwhelmed by that load, what was He anxious about? Who was He anxious for? His disciples. You and me. Oh, brothers and sisters, such a Lord. Such a Lord we have.

I Peter 3:18. This ethical issue that has been brought up. You know, brothers and sisters, there are so many things that we wouldn’t even have to address if someone didn’t come up with this idea. But it’s precisely because there are so many slight perversions of the truth that we have to address what the truth is so precisely. It has been said that Christ–and there is a school of thought on this, a growing school of thought–that Christ had to bear Himself the sinfulness of nature in Himself in order to be condemned and crucified for it. It’s suggested that otherwise it would have been unethical for Christ to die on account of something that He wasn’t in Himself.

I Peter 3:18: “For Christ also suffered once for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive by the spirit.” Brothers and sisters, it was only because He was just, righteous in Himself, that he could die for the unjust, the unrighteous. And the offering that He gave, that which was the sacrifice was His what? His humanity. Correct? It was His humanity that He gave. Therefore, His humanity had to be sinless. It was ethical for Christ to die for man. Why? Two reasons. He made us and, being God, He could offer a sacrifice equal to the value of the law that was broken.

Consider both of these with me. First of all, He made us. Since the law of Jehovah is the foundation of His government in heaven, as well as upon the earth, even the life of an angel could not be accepted as a sacrifice for its transgression. Not one of its precepts could be abrogated or changed to meet man in his fallen condition. But the Son of God, who had created man, could make an atonement for him. As Adam’s transgression had brought wretchedness and death, so the sacrifice of Christ would bring life and immortality. What made it ethically right for Christ to die for the fallen race? He created the fallen race.

Though–please understand–our sin was no fault of His, though it was not due to the way He made us, still having made us, He could legally and ethically choose to stand in our stead, pay our debt, and meet the infinite standard of God’s law in our behalf. Only the Creator could do this ethically because He made us.

Secondly, He could ethically die, the just for the unjust, because He had in Himself a righteousness that was equivalent to the infinite standard and an absolute sinlessness that allowed Him to pay the debt. Review and Herald, December 17, 1872: “Christ alone could open the way by making an offering equal to the demands of the divine law. He was perfect and undefiled by sin. He was without spot or blemish. The extent of the terrible consequences of sin could never have been known had not the remedy provided been of infinite value. The salvation of fallen man was procured at such an immense cost that the angels marveled and could not fully comprehend the divine mystery, that the majesty of heaven, equal with God, should die for the rebellious race. Was it ethical? Yes, it was ethical, because He was our Creator and because He was equal with God and, therefore, of greater value than the broken law.

Signs of the Times, May 13, 1895: “A complete offering has been made for God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten son, one equal with God in authority, dignity and divine perfection. In Him dwelt all the fullness of the Godhead.” How? Bodily. Praise God for the provision. How perfect, how full it is. Praise God that Jesus Christ was absolutely sinless.

And brothers and sisters, to what end did He bear this load of sin that crushed out His very life? Back to our text, II Corinthians 5:21. What does God’s word say? “For he made him who knew no sin for us that we might become” what? “The righteousness of God” where? “In him.” Oh, brothers and sisters, that was the reason He became sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him. To do both. To be our Substitute in death and to be our Substitute in life. To be our Substitute in dying to pay our debt. To be our Substitute in living a perfect life to meet the infinite standard in our behalf. In both these aspects, He had to be absolutely sinless in His humanity to accomplish His mission.

Remember, the law requires that we have not only absolute sinlessness but that we have what? Infinite righteousness. We are hopeless unless we have One that has both absolute sinlessness and infinite righteousness. I hope that we have clearly established that in Christ we do have One who has absolute sinlessness. We must assure ourselves that in Christ we also have One who has infinite righteousness.

May the Lord bless us this Sabbath as we think on these things. Shall we bow our heads. Prayer.

Quotes from the Bible and the Spirit of Prophecy as used in this lesson for your reference. 😉

 

RH Nov 29, 1887 “From the cross to the crown there is earnest work to be done, there is wrestling with inbred sin.”

HP 156 “We are enlightened by the precepts of the law but no man can by them be justified.  Weighed and found wanting is our inscription by nature.  But Christ is our Mediator and accepting Him as our Savior, we may claim the promise, ‘being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.’” (Rom 5:1).

Rom 3:19,20,23 “Now we know that whatever the law says, it says to those who are under the law that every mouth may be stopped and all the world may become guilty before God.  (verse 20)  Therefore, by the deeds of the law shall no flesh be justified in His sight, for by the law, is the knowledge of sin.  (verse 23)  For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God.

SL 81 “He who is truly seeking holiness of heart and life delights in the law of God, and mourns only that he falls so far short of meeting its requirements.”

2 Cor 5:21 “For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God, in Him.”

Manuscript 80, 1903 “In the councils of heaven before the creation of the world, when it was planned that man should people the earth, there arose the question, What if man should sin, as Satan has?  Christ answered this question.  The infinite Son of God pledged Himself that if man should sin, He would give Himself, His life, as a ransom for the fallen race, taking upon Himself the transgression of humanity.  The innocent would bear the sins of the guilty, and stand before God to make intercession in behalf of the transgressor.”

Bible Echoes Aug 1, 1893 “Through the death of Christ a door of hope was opened for the fallen race.  Man was under sentence of death for the transgression of the law of God.  He was under condemnation as a traitor, as a rebel, but Christ came to be his Substitute, to die as a malfactor, to suffer the penalty of the traitors, bearing the weight of their sins upon His divine soul.”

RH July 17, 1900 “In His sinlessness, He would bear every transgression.”

3SM 131 “Christ did not possess the same sinful, corrupt, fallen disloyalty we possess, for then He could not be a perfect offering.

1 Pet 2:22 “Who committed no sin, nor was guile found in His mouth.

2 Cor 5:21 “For He made Him who knew no sin, to be sin, for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.”

RH Sep 17, 1895 “Human nature is depraved and is justly condemned by a holy God.”

1 John 3:5 “And you know that He was manifested to take away our sins, and in Him there is no sin.”

ST May 29, 1901 “In the fullness of time He was to be revealed in human form.  He was to take His position at the head of humanity by taking the nature but not the sinfulness of man.

Manuscript 143, 1897 “There should not be the faintest misgivings in regard to the perfect freedom from sinfulness in the human nature of Christ.”

ST June 9, 1898 “We should have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ.”

2SP 9 “Man could not atone for man.  His sinful, fallen condition would constitute him an imperfect offering, an atoning sacrifice of less value than Adam before his fall.  God made man perfect and upright and after his transgression there could be no sacrifice acceptable to God for him, unless the offering made should in value be superior to man as he was in his state of perfection and innocency.”

2SP 11 “Christ alone could open the way by making an offering equal to the demands of the divine law.  He was perfect and undefiled by sin.  He was without spot or blemish.”

ST June 9, 1898 “We should have no misgivings in regard to the perfect sinlessness of the human nature of Christ.  Our faith must be an intelligent faith.  Looking unto Jesus in perfect confidence, in full and entire faith in the atoning sacrifice.  This is essential that the soul may not be shrouded in darkness.  The holy Substitute is able to save to the uttermost, for He presented to the wondering universe perfect and complete humility in His human character and perfect obedience to all the requirements of God.”

Manuscript 92, 1891 “Christ was without sin, else His life in human flesh and His death on the cross would have been of no more value in procuring grace for the sinner than the death of any man.”

5BC 1128,9 “Never in any way leave the slightest impression upon human minds that a taint of or inclination to corruption rested upon Christ, or that He in any way yielded to corruption.  Let every human being be warned from the ground of making Christ altogether human, such an one as ourselves, for it cannot be.”

1 Peter 2:24 “Who Himself bore our sins in His own body on the tree that we, having died to sins, might live for righteousness, by whose stripes we are healed.”

Manuscript 48A, 1897 “The sins of the guilty world which in figure are represented as red as crimson were imputed to the divine surety.  Surely He hath borne our griefs.  He was made sin for us, because He was innocent of all sin.  The Lord hath laid on Him the iniquity of us all.”

ST Dec 5, 1892 “Guiltless, He bore the punishment of the guilty.  Innocent, yet offering Himself as a Substitute for the transgressor.  The guilt of every sin pressed its weight upon the divine soul of the world’s Redeemer.”

Isa 53:6,7 “And the Lord has laid on Him the iniquity of us all.  He was oppressed and He was afflicted, yet He opened not His mouth.  He was led as a Lamb to the slaughter.”

ST Dec 9, 1897 “All the accumulated sin of the world was laid upon the Sin-bearer, the One who alone could be the propitiation for sin, because He Himself was obedient.”

ST May 19, 1890 “Adam sinned and the children of Adam share his quilt and its consequences.  But Jesus bore the quilt of Adam, and all the children of Adam that will flee to Christ, the second Adam, may escape the penalty of transgression.”

Rom 5:19 “By the disobedience of one the many were made sinners, even so, by the obedience of One, the many will be made righteous.”

DA 598 “Those who trust in Him He never disappoints.  He has borne every test, He has endured the pressure of Adam’s guilt and the quilt of his posterity, and has come off more than conqueror of the powers of evil.  He has borne the burdens cast upon Him by every repenting sinner.  In Christ, the guilty heart has found relief.  He is the sure foundation.  All who make Him their dependence rest in perfect security.”

AA 561 men who would rather die than knowingly transgress God’s law… “confessed the sinfulness of their nature.”

UL 51 “He (Christ) was nearing the close of His ministry upon this earth and was standing in view of the cross with a full realization of the load of quilt that must be placed upon Him as Sin-bearer.  Yet, His greatest anxiety was for His disciples.

1 Peter 3:18 “For Christ also suffered once for sins, the just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive by the Spirit.”

RH Dec 17, 1872 “Christ alone could open the way by making an offering equal to the demands of the divine law.  He was perfect and undefiled by sin.  He was without spot or blemish.  The extent of the terrible consequences of sin could never have been known had not the remedy provided been of infinite value.   The salvation of fallen man was procured at such an immense cost that angels marveled and could not fully comprehend the divine mystery, that the majesty of Heaven, equal with God, should die for the rebellious race.”

ST May 13, 1895 “A complete offering has been made; for ‘God so loved the world, that he gave his only-begotten Son,’— not a son by creation, as were the angels, nor a son by adoption, as is the forgiven sinner, but a Son begotten in the express image of the Father’s person, and in all the brightness of his majesty and glory, one equal with God in authority, dignity, and Divine perfection. In him dwelt all the fullness of the Godhead bodily.”

2 Cor 5:21 “For He made Him who knew no sin, to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God, in Him.”

😉

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